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Rat

This section contains 5 tutorials

Subcutaneous Injection in the Rat

Subcutaneous Injection in the Rat

Subcutaneous administration of material often causes minimal pain or discomfort, provided the material is non-irritant, has a near-neutral pH, and is not excessively hypertonic or hypotonic…

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Intravenous Injection in the Rat

Intravenous Injection in the Rat

Intravenous administration of material can be technically difficult, and use of a restraining device is often required. These should be selected carefully to be an appropriate size for the animal to be injected. Too small a device can result in injuries to the animal, and can interfere with respiratory movements. Too large a restrainer can also result in injury, caused by movements during restraint…

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Intramuscular Injection in the Rat

Intramuscular Injection in the RatIntramuscular injections are made into the front or back of the thigh in all small rodents. In the rat and guinea pig the muscle mass is usually sufficient for accurate administration of small volumes of material (e.g. <0.1ml/kg)…

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Oral Gavage in the Rat

Oral Gavage in the RatMaterial can be administered orally using a number of different techniques, although gavage using a stomach tube is the most widely used. To minimise the risk of adverse effects associated with this procedure, it is important that the operator is skilled both in the technique and the restraint method needed…

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Intraperitoneal Injection in the Rat

Intraperitoneal Injection in the Rat

Although widely used as a means of administering substances, particularly injectable anaesthetics, this is an inherently unreliable technique, since inadvertent injection of some material into the gut, abdominal fat and subcutaneous tissues is a relatively frequent occurrence…

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ADMINISTRATION
OF SUBSTANCES

A series of tutorials to assist research workers develop their skills in the administration of substances to laboratory animals.

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